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Minicourse EDTH-GP20

Image reconstruction for diffuse optical tomography

Guy Perkins

About this course

Image reconstruction for diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is aimed at a beginner audience, people new to DOT and fNIRS. The course will start by introducing what DOT is, outline the context of it and the considerations that should be made when performing DOT. This includes consideration of source-detector placement, different paradigms of fNIRS (e.g., Continuous wave, frequency domain, time domain), the sensitivity of sampling and what this means (e.g., Explaining the jacobian or ‘A’ matrix) and introduce the advancements of high-density DOT (HD-DOT). The course will then introduce different hardware and software options before looking at image reconstruction, starting from the modelling of light transport in tissue to the inversion of the Jacobian and the derivation of changes in optical properties and chromophore concentrations. Then, some examples of DOT are given, which concludes the theoretical part of the course. There will be a short hands-on demonstration of DOT using NIRFAST which is expected to last between 30-60 minutes.

Learning Outcomes

At the end of the course, attendees should:

  • Understand the difference between fNIRS and DOT.
  • Understand what factors to consider when doing DOT.
  • Be aware of the different software and hardware options for experiments wanting to perform DOT (and fNIRS)
  • Understand how image reconstruction works and the parameters that affect it.
  • Have some experience doing DOT with some data and NIRFAST.

Course Plan

Level: Introductory

Pre-Requisites: None
Course Duration: 2.5 hours

Delivery Plan

90 min: Theoretical aspects of DOT
60 min: Hands-on using NIRFAST

Why enrol on this course?

The rational of the course is to introduce people to the principles behind DOT and what they should think about and consider if they want to do DOT in their experiments. At the end of the course, the attendee should: understand the difference between fNIRS and DOT; understand what factors to consider when doing DOT; be aware of the different software and hardware options for experiments wanting to perform DOT (and fNIRS); understand how image reconstruction works and the parameters that effect it, and; have some experience doing DOT with some data and NIRFAST.